Rob Melendez, MD, MBA

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Transformational Leadership starts with transforming yourself…Be more than a manager, be a Leader.

Check back and learn more about leadership.

 

Managers count value

Leaders create value by…

 

“I’ll handle A and you handle B.” A Leader.

Empower others to succeed on their own.

 

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7 Personal Habits Every CEO Should Have | Inc.com

7 Personal Habits Every CEO Should Have | Inc.com.

Ophthalmology Chief Resident as Manager & Leader

Chief Resident as Manager and Leader

Rob Melendez, MD, MBA

Managers are about Controlling and Problem Solving

Leaders are Motivating and Inspiring

What are the differences between a Manager and a Leader? The goal of this article is to identify when we are displaying each trait and how we can become better leaders and managers. Mangers tend to run the day-to-day activities and Leaders tend to run the year to year activities. As a chief resident, your main role is as a manager with opportunities to display leadership. Managers tend to be controlling and problem solvers whereas Leaders tend to be more motivating and inspiring. Below are some examples of each.

Chief Resident as Manager-Controlling and Problem Solving

-Identify the weak areas of performance on the OKAP exam and create study strategies to improve. Create study sessions for future residents and a study plan for the year.

-Look for ways to problem solve whether it is fixing the call schedule to arranging the Grand Rounds presentations.

-Try to involve the residents in solving the solution. This is actually displaying leadership too. This will empower the residents and hopefully prepare one of them for the chief resident position.

Chief Resident as Leader-Motivating and Inspiring

-Encourage residents to remain positive even though some of them may not have scored as well as others on the OKAP exam.

-By sharing your score, this could motivate others to do better next year or inspire them how brilliant they are because they did better than you. A leader tries to be transparent and creates the opportunity for others to learn from them.

-Offer incentives for doing well on the OKAP exam. This act will motivate the residents.

Encouraging your residents to study extra hard for the OKAP exam and making it one of the highest priorities only makes it easier for them when it is time to take the written and oral board examination.

-One way to inspire your residents is when you are on back-up call. Plan to go in and help with a couple of patients while your lower level resident is on-call. Offer to buy them coffee or a drink. Try to do this unexpectedly and with every resident. They will appreciate your kindness. Take this opportunity to teach a pearl or two.

Manager vs. Leader

Chief Resident as Manager and Leader

Rob Melendez, MD, MBA

“As a chief resident, your main role is as a manager with opportunities to display leadership.”

Chief Resident as Manager Skill Set: Reacts to Change

Chief Resident as Leader Skill Set: Creates Change

What are the differences between a Manager and a Leader? The goal of this article is to identify when we are displaying each trait and how we can become better leaders and managers. Managers tend to react to change more than leaders do. Managers are those who respond to a resident calling in sick and make the necessary scheduling changes. The manager chief resident reacts to a disgruntled fellow resident because of their lack of free time or not enough vacation time. The Leader Chief Resident creates change in the program that serves future residents.

As a chief resident, you will be performing more managerial tasks than leadership tasks. Your goal this year is to begin creating change rather than simply reacting to it. Identify the problems that occurred the year before and create action plans to solve them for this year.

Issue: Resident is pregnant, and needs 8 weeks off for maternity leave. What are the implications of this decision? More on-call times for the other residents, more grand round presentations? Instead of simply reacting to this scenario, create an action plan for future years. This is demonstrating leadership and vision. Often times, as leaders, we are called to look beyond just our own needs and try to improve the overall process that will have lasting benefits in your program far after you have already left. Identify scenarios similar to this that have the potential to occur in your chief year and create a plan. Creating a plan for a resident who needs time off for maternity leave or for a male resident who requests paternity leave will help guide your decisions when it actually happens. Involve as many people as you can to help solve this issue.Just because you are chief resident, it doesn’t mean you will have all of the answers. Involve others to help solve problems and to better understand their perspectives. Creating a policy at the beginning of the year will help minimize confusion as to what is expected from the resident requesting time off. As chief resident, try to maintain fairness with this process. Most residents are understanding, but try to provide something extra for the residents that might have to work extra harder during this time off for one of the fellow residents. Ask your program director to sponsor a Friday lunch or a fun activity on one evening to reward the residents’ hard work.

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